Tag Archives: writing

Confessions of an Author: Feeling Like an Imposter

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See my Confessions of an Author page

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Filed under #OnBeingAWriter, Books, Confessions of an Author, Creative Writing, Indie Publishing, Memoir, Poetry, Publishing, Real Life of a Writer, Self-Published Authors, Stories, Storytelling, Traditional Publishing, Writing

Writing Prompts 1-10

Missed any of my other writing prompts?
You can find them here:

WritingPrompts

These are all original writing prompts. Writing prompts © 2019 by Alexandria Szeman.
All rights reserved. No content may be copied, excerpted, or distributed
without express written consent of the author, with copyright credit to the author.
Please don’t support the piracy of Intellectual Property.

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Filed under Writing, Writing Exercises, Writing Prompts

More Great Folks to Follow on Twitter

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Cool Folks to Follow on Twitter

Cool Folks to Follow on Twitter

Good morning, my Lovelies. It's #WW and though I'm not sure exactly what that hashtag means, I thought I'd let you know about some more ...
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Great Folks to Follow on Twitter

Great Folks to Follow on Twitter

Old school #FF, my Lovelies: I let you know why you might like to follow these people. Mostly, my #FF suggestions are for good content ...
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More Great Folks to Follow on Twitter

More Great Folks to Follow on Twitter

Old-fashioned #FF FollowFriday, my Lovelies: not just a list of names, but info on the account I recommend that you follow. I can't guarantee they'll ...
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Even More Great Folks to Follow on Twitter

Even More Great Folks to Follow on Twitter

Time for some old-school #FF for anyone on Twitter, but especially for writers and authors. These accounts give you great content to share with your ...
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Great Accounts to Follow on Twitter for Great Content

Great Accounts to Follow on Twitter for Great Content

Time for some old-school Follow Fridays #FF, my Lovelies. I can't guarantee that any of the accounts I recommend will follow you back, but they ...
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More Great Accounts to Follow on Twitter For More Great Content

More Great Accounts to Follow on Twitter For More Great Content

Old school Follow Friday #FF, my lovelies. These accounts, whether or not they belong to authors, consistently give good content, for you and for your ...
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Great Accounts to Follow on Twitter for All Things Writerly

Great Accounts to Follow on Twitter for All Things Writerly

Ready for some old-fashioned #FF FollowFriday? This isn't a list of names for you to blindly follow in the hope that they might follow you ...
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More Great Accounts to Follow on Twitter for More Things Writerly

More Great Accounts to Follow on Twitter for More Things Writerly

Time for some old-fashioned #FF Follow Friday here on the Twitter, my Lovelies. Mostly the emphasis this morning is on accounts for #writers and #authors, ...
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Good Accounts to Follow on Twitter for Good Content

Good Accounts to Follow on Twitter for Good Content

Good morning, my Lovelies. Time for some old-school #FF here on the Twitter. Not just a list of names of people who might follow you ...
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Follow These Accounts for Your Good Health

Follow These Accounts for Your Good Health

Time for some old-fashioned Follow Friday #FF, my Lovelies. Not just a list of names, but a curated list of some of the best accounts ...
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Follow These Accounts to Be a Better Writer and Author

Follow These Accounts to Be a Better Writer and Author

Time for some old-school Follow Friday #FF, my Lovelies, with some accounts of writers who share lots of fantastic information about all things writerly. Go, ...
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Follow These Accounts for All Things Health, Mindfulness, Writing, and #NaNoProMo

Follow These Accounts for All Things Health, Mindfulness, Writing, and #NaNoProMo

#FF the great writers of @MigraineMantras, where I am also proud to be the manager of the Twitter account. MM was chosen by @Healthline as ...
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Filed under #FF, Tweeting, Twitter, Twitter for Writers

Handling Writer’s Block and Other Writing Challenges

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Filed under #WritingTips, Creative Writing, Self-Published Authors, Writing, Writing & Revising

Make NaNoWriMo Last All Year

Photo by Christopher Campbell © Unsplash

Every November, hundreds of thousands of people around the world do something that might break them spiritually, psychically, or psychologically — though probably not physically: they attempt to write the first draft of an entire novel in 30 days. The goal is to write a 50,000-word novel (175 DS manuscript pages, based on a count of approximately 300 words per page) in thirty days. That’s about 1,700 words (or six DS manuscript pages) a day. Besides training for and entering an Iron Man Competition, National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo as it’s known to participants, has to be one of the most challenging and demanding tasks anyone can voluntarily give himself.

Participants are not supposed to publish the book they write during NaNoWriMo as is. The NaNoWriMo book is the first draft. Writers have to revise, edit, get feedback from readers, re-write, edit, revise more, have some coffee, then decide whether they want to Indie publish or attempt to get an agent and try for the traditional New York publishing route.

NaNoWriMo is not about getting published or about being an author.

NaNoWriMo is about being a writer.

If you participated in NaNoWriMo, you probably learned as much about yourself as you did about your novel.  Even if you didn’t manage to complete the requisite 50K, even if you only worked on an outline for your planned novel, you did something important. If you learned nothing more than how difficult it is to write full-time, then you learned the most important thing NaNoWriMo could ever teach you about being a writer. Here are some tips for helping you continue to write full-time, all year long.

Photo by Alejandro Escamilla © Unsplash

Pretend It’s Your Job

As I wrote in another post, some of the best advice I ever got about writing came from a friend when I took nine months off work to write my first novel — 9 months without pay, after having borrowed $11K from the bank (at 17 & ⅞% interest, for a total loan repayment of $18K). At that time, though I’d been writing regularly and been extensively published in literary and university journals for over 10 years, I’d only written when inspiration struck me, i.e., in short, intensive bursts every few months. I’d never been paid for writing, had never published a book, and had never done it every day, all day long, for an extended period. I’d also only written poetry, which is easier to write sporadically since poems are quite a bit shorter than novels.

After almost a year trying to write my first novel while working several jobs, I’d gotten the bright idea to borrow money from the bank to write my book. To my shock, the bank approved the loan, based on my extensive publications and literary prizes. During the first month of my sabbatical, I didn’t write anything at all: instead, I spent my time thinking about my novel, all day long, every day. When I realized how much it had cost me to think for a month, I panicked. That’s when my best friend suggested that I think at my desk, with a pen in my hand, holding my pen over a tablet of paper. Further, she suggested that I pretend writing was my job, which meant getting up, getting dressed, going to my desk, and writing at the same time every day.

Pretending that writing was my job changed my life.

Celebrity authors are not the only full-time writers in the world: all of us who eventually got published had to write for a long time before our books received contracts. Full-time writers, including traditionally published authors, almost always have other jobs: they rarely can support themselves and their families solely from writing income. Full-time writers are those who’ve made a serious and long-term commitment to writing, no matter what their day-job is, how long their daily commute, how small their writing or office space, how large their family, or how extensive their outside obligations.

A full-time writer writes like it’s his job, even if he’s never gotten paid for his writing.

If you want to make NaNoWriMo last all year long, treat writing as your job.

Photo by STIL © Unsplash

Get a Calendar and
Schedule Writing Time

When you have a job as a writer, you don’t merely write the time you have already spent writing on the calendar: you write down the time you are going to spend writing. Like it’s your job. You know what time you have to be at your job, and if you have multiple jobs, as I’ve had almost all of my life, you write down where you have to be and the time you have to be there. When I wrote for that year that I took off work, I wrote down, in advance, the times I was supposed to be writing, and I continued that practice after I went back to my paying job.

That’s how I got into the habit of getting up and writing by 5 every morning. I scheduled [Name of Book] on my calendar from 5-7 every morning. That meant I had to be at my desk writing by that time, not just getting out of bed, or lying there hitting the snooze button. I did it on the weekends, too, but scheduled my writing for at least 8 hours on weekends and holidays. Since I was used to getting up and working by 5, it was no inconvenience to continue doing that after I went back to work at my paying job.

For NaNoWriMo, you planned in advance to write the entire month, and you planned to get a certain number of words written a day. To continue the NaNoWriMo experience, get yourself a calendar and schedule your writing time in advance, just as you would your job, your vacation, holidays, or any doctors’ appointments.

Keep that scheduled commitment and be there writing.

Photo by Allef Vincius © Unsplash

Consider Writing Time
as Your Apprenticeship

You have to pay your dues in practically any job. Sometimes you have to do volunteer work in your chosen field in order to have experience. Often, people educated in a particular field have to complete an apprenticeship, internship, or residency to get sufficient practical experience to qualify for a paying position in the field of their choice. Being a writer — and eventually an author — is the same as any other field. Everyone puts in plenty of time writing without getting paid or having any guarantee of publication.

Consider any time you spend writing before publication as your own apprenticeship,  internship, or residency until you get really good at it.

If you are traditionally published after you finish your book, it is unlikely that you will get a large enough Advance to live on. You may become a bestseller, but, given how long it takes for a traditionally published book to reach bookstores after it’s sold to the Publishing House, you won’t get rich immediately. That means you’ll be writing your subsequent book with no guarantee of additional money or of another publishing contract.

Think of NaNoWriMo as the beginning of your internship.

Now extend that month of your writing internship for the entire year.

After you’ve published your first book, you will be an author, but all authors still have to write, and they write all year long, not just in November.

Photo by Andrew Neel © Unsplash

Choose to Write

You are not super-human, so you will have to make choices if you want to include writing in your life. For me, it meant delaying children because I needed all my time for college, grad school, teaching, retail jobs, and writing. If you really want to be a writer, writing should always be at the top of your list of priorities and commitments. If it’s not, stop reading this post and go do something else: you don’t want to be a writer bad enough.

Next on your list of priorities, put your paying job since you have to support yourself and your writing, which costs money even if you don’t Indie publish. Put your family or permanent relationships after that. Anything else can be considered superfluous and can be eliminated.

You need to make choices in life, especially if you want to be a writer: it is such a time-consuming career. If you want to be an author, which is a published writer, you will still have to write.

If you want NaNoWriMo to last longer than the month of November, you have to establish your priorities and make conscious choices that will guarantee you have sufficient writing time.

Photo by Arno Smit © Unsplash

Be Ready to Open the Door
When Opportunity Knocks

To unpublished writers, being traditionally published is like being in the Garden of Eden, but nobody wakes up already in Published Author Paradise. You must always be writing, revising, editing, writing more, completing your books, improving your craft, searching for agents, submitting your work to editors and agents, and writing even more. That way, when the Getting Published Opportunity knocks on your door, you’ll be qualified to answer the door with (at least one) polished, finished book in hand.

NaNoWriMo gives you a taste of what being a writer is like.

If you want to be a published author, use your NaNoWriMo experience to continue being a full-time writer, whether or not you have another paying job. You’ll be writing more than one month out of the year, and you’ll also be finishing your books so that you’ll have something to publish when your opportunity to become an author arrives.

Photo by Christine Roy © Unsplash

Don’t Expect Fame & Fortune

As any artist in any field can readily tell you, there is a very small number of celebrities in any field who are well known to everyone, get any job they want, make most of the money, get all the attention, and make most of the money.

Don’t expect fame. Don’t expect fortune. Those things cannot be controlled.

The amount of time you spend writing is the only thing that can be controlled. Expect, therefore, to write, write, write. And then to write some more.

If you’re lucky, you might get some prizes, or a big Advance from one of the traditional publishers, or an option on your book that actually leads to a big movie deal, but don’t expect or plan on any of these things because that’s just not the way the artistic world works.

Expect to be a writer.

You experienced that during NaNoWriMo, so you already know what it’s like to write.

Now, go write.

Photo by Christopher Campbell © Unsplash

Take Care of Yourself
Spiritually, Emotionally, & Physically

Writing is a taxing business. It’s much harder than any job you leave behind at the workplace when you clock out at the end of the day. For that reason, you need to exercise, eat healthily, and should probably do some form of meditation daily.

You also need to keep negative people away from you: there’s enough rejection in this business. You don’t need negative people “rejecting” you as a writer in your personal life as well. Eliminate the negative people in your life even if they are family members, friends, or spouses. Surround yourself instead with loving and supportive people who encourage you to be a writer. Additionally, find writing-support groups, reliable beta-readers, and good editors.

Rest when necessary.

Don’t forget to play.

After all, if you don’t take care of yourself, you won’t be able to write.

Photo by Raw Pixel © Unsplash

If you truly wish to be a writer, you can’t just write when you feel like it, or when inspiration hits you, or when your muses are singing to you, or when it happens to be convenient. You have to make a commitment to writing. You have to make conscious choices to have the time to write. Despite NaNoWriMo, which I think is a wonderful idea, you cannot spend only one month a year committed to writing as a priority in your life.

Writing has to be your life.

And you have to take care of yourself emotionally, spiritually, and physically so that you can continue to write. That way, NaNoWriMo can last more than a month: it can last all year, every year, for the rest of your life.

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Filed under #WritingTips, Authors, Creative Writing, NaNoWriMo, Real Life of a Writer, Writing, Writing & Revising